It's Wight not White

Isle of Wight

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Where did the name come from?

A little bit of insight.

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The Spelling

If you are new to England's favourite island destination, then it's quite understandable if you wouldn't get the spelling right first time. Its name sounds like the colour when in fact the correct spelling is Isle of Wight or IW for short.

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The Name

There doesn't seem to be a definitive explanation as to how the Island originally got its name, although a local history website quotes the following: 'Around 1900 BC the Beaker people arrived - so called from their distinctive pottery.

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Romans

They called the Island Wiht (weight) meaning raised or what rises over the sea. Then the Romans arrived in 43 AD and translated Wiht into the name Vectis from the Latin veho meaning lifting.'

Slice of History

The Isle of Wight was famously home to Queen Victoria, who built her much-loved summer residence and final home Osborne House at East Cowes.

It has a maritime and industrial tradition including boat building, sail making, the manufacture of flying boats, the world's first hovercraft, and the testing and development of Britain's space rockets.
The Island hosts annual festivals including the Bestival and the Isle of Wight Festival, which, in 1970, was the largest rock music event ever held. It has a diversity of wildlife including one of the last strongholds for Red Squirrels and some of the richest cliffs and quarries for dinosaur fossils in Europe.

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Photo Gallery

The Isle of Wight offers beautiful scenery no matter where abouts you may find yourself located.

Take a look through the gallery at some of the images shot in different locations. The Isle of Wight is shaped like a diamond and so 57 miles of coastline is available to explore whilst you are never more than a few miles from the sea wherever you are on the Island. Each coast is very different in character and range from river estuaries to soaring cliffs.

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Getting Here

It is very easy to visit and it's amazing how the short sea crossing can transport you to another world. Depart from Portsmouth, Southampton or Lymington in the New Forest using Wightlink, Red Funnel or Hovertravel. Foot passenger services from Portsmouth and Southampton can take less than 20 minutes, whilst car ferries can complete the journey in just 40 minutes. Crossing the Solent is all part of the experience of travelling to the Isle of Wight.

Wightlink

Red Funnel

Contact Us

Visit isleofwight.co.uk or drop us a line!

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A special thanks to Death.

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